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INDUSTRY NEWS

2020 Oregon Election Candidates Respond to Production Industry Survey

Hola

We reached out to some key candidates in this year’s local elections to find out how their priorities align with ours and the media professionals we represent. We’ve included their responses here for your review.

OMPA will not be issuing any endorsements; this information is to help you make your own informed decisions.


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LIST OF CANDIDATES

Clockwise from top-left: Lisa Reynolds, Jason Kropf, Mingus Mapps, Sarah Iannarone, Deb Patterson, Ted Wheeler, Teressa Raiford

Click a name below to jump to that candidate’s responses.

Note: Only those candidates who returned a completed survey are included here.

MAYOR OF PORTLAND

Ted Wheeler

Sarah Iannarone

Teressa Raiford

PORTLAND CITY COMMISSIONER

Mingus Mapps, City Commission Position No. 4

STATE REPRESENTATIVES

Lisa Reynolds, Oregon House District 36 (Portland)

Jason Kropf Oregon House District 54 (Bend)

STATE SENATOR

Deb Patterson Senate District 10 (Salem)


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RESPONSES

MAYOR OF PORTLAND

Ted Wheeler

Please give an overview of your economic development plan. What part does media production play in Portland’s economy? 

Portland has a reputation for innovation, creative-thinking, great food, and wonderful natural spaces. In my four years as Mayor I have worked to support our “brand” and encouraged investment and innovation in our city. I have supported clean energy projects, better funding of our parks, and investment in projects like the Broadway Corridor which will bring new businesses, affordable housing, and growth to our city. In addition, I have also brought forward the Portland Means Progress initiative, which helps local companies establish job and internship training for underrepresented youth, increases purchasing from diverse businesses, and encourages local companies to be more inclusive in their company cultures and hiring practices. 

Media production plays a tremendous role in our local economy. As Lisa noted in a letter to my office, the TV show “Shrill” brought approximately $6 million to our economy during its three months in Portland shooting its second season. Shows like “Shrill,” “Portland,” “Grimm,” etc. have brought worldwide recognition to Portland and I want to continue to support that. 

What is your general opinion of the Oregon Production investment Fund (OPIF)? Would you direct city resources, such as the work of the City’s lobbyist, to support these programs? 

As state treasurer I supported the program and was responsible for managing investments and interest earned in regard to the OPIF. I support the program and will continue to support it in conjunction with the Portland Film Office. 

This year the Portland Film Office was nearly cut out of the City’s budget yet that office is critical to attracting film, television and commercial production and its spending to the city. Would you support the City finding a way to pay for the Portland Film Office considering its economic and tourism impact?

Yes, I do. As Lisa noted in her letter to my office, TV shows like “Shrill” and countless others bring in significant revenue to our city. The Portland Film Office facilitates permitting and general production for companies filming in Portland. We have had to make some tough decisions as a result of COVID-19’s impact on our local economy but I would like to look at ways to better fund the office, without using General Funds. 

It is imperative that we support a diverse talent pipeline in this industry. One program we have in place is Oregon Media Pathways that places traditionally underrepresented candidates into paid positions on productions. How could you see the City supporting this or related equity focused programming? 

As I mentioned above, my office emphasizes equity in everything that we do. This includes the Portland Means Progress Initiative, the Portland Clean Energy Fund, and even our response to COVID-19, where we have prioritized supporting women and BIPOC-owned businesses throughout our city. I am glad to see Oregon Media Pathways supporting such an initiative and look forward to finding ways to further collaborate to promote diversity in media and every other industry in our city. 

What steps would you take to attract more media production projects to Portland? 

I plan to continue to support and encourage the work of the Portland Film Office. This office is a collaboration of the mayor’s office, Prosper Portland, and dedicated resources within city bureaus. I will also continue to work with all entities that encourage tourism to Portland and promote our city’s image nationally as a way to draw more media production projects here.

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Sarah Iannarone

Please give an overview of your economic development plan. What part does media production play in Portland’s economy? 

I am running for mayor of Portland and while a great deal of industry-scale development should be done at state and regional levels, there are things the city of Portland can do to ensure access to good paying, green collar jobs for our workers while ensuring they have homes they can afford so they can live here and transit to access them.  Portland’s brand as a creative innovation hub is strong around the world. I’ve worked the last ten years internationally answering requests from visiting leaders in cities around the world coming to Portland to study our policies and best practices for economic competitiveness, including from the film and media industry in Brazil, Japan, and New Zealand. Together, we’ve explored our regional comparative advantage in the global marketplace, including investments in education, workforce development, and production-related small business. I know we are on the right track, but there is so much more we can be doing to ensure our local industry (which includes digital comics and gaming) is a pathway to opportunity for Portlanders that is low-carbon and lifts up our BIPOC community members.  In the post-COVID world, business as usual is no longer an option, so we have released a plan for Portland’s recovery that in fact does outline our economic priorities for the future. Of relevance to your industry would be the section on investments in a Thriving Cultural and Creative Economy– you can read the plan in full at sarah2020.com/recovery, but here are some noteworthy points:

  • Portland’s artists and creatives are powerhouses at the center of our economy and we must fight to protect, grow, and diversify the thousands of jobs and hundreds of millions in annual economic impact undergirding Portland’s vibrancy. [1] In the past decade, Portland has taken our human arts and cultural capital for granted. If we want artists and creatives and makers to thrive in our city, we must ensure them a living wage, housing they can afford, and the other protections they need to survive and thrive here. In particular, we must robustly fund capacity building for culturally specific organizations.
  • It’s time to get rid of the Arts Tax once and for all. We must replace Portland’s broken, regressive head tax with a progressive, fair-share approach to funding arts, culture, education, programming, and creative, maker, and art spaces.
  • Innovate ways to support Portland Parks & Recreation through investments in arts and culture infrastructure and programming. We need to break down silos that undermine our ability to maintain our crumbling municipal infrastructure. By bundling municipal activities across bureaus, we can support our perennially threatened parks budget through arts and education funding and as well as through investments in neighborhood-scale amenities like Community Safety Hubs and childcare centers. (Sarah has endorsed the Universal Preschool Now effort.) 
  • Rethink city zoning and development processes for more affordable housing, creative and makerspaces. You can read more about Sarah’s ideas for affordable housing and mixed-use zones here.


RELATED CONTENT
Hear more from Sarah Iannarone and Mingus Mapps, plus current Portland Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, in our Fall Candidate Forum (recording). The forum was hosted in partnership with MusicPortland, RACC, and Design Week Portland.
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What is your general opinion of the Oregon Production investment Fund (OPIF) and the indigenous Oregon Production Investment Fund (iOPIF)? How would you direct city resources to support these programs? 

We want every public dollar regardless of its source leveraged for maximum impact. Portland has clearly demonstrated capacity to do just this by building innovative partnerships to advance economic and urban development based on our values of equity, resiliency, and sustainability. The best thing that the city can do sometimes is bring stakeholders together in creative ways and then get out of the way. There are existing successful frameworks from biotech that apply here, including spending on technical support and start-up resources for entrepreneurs, focusing on career pathways, and place-based initiatives that could include access to affordable creative space and rethinking city zoning for “light industrial” uses.  For this to be effective, the Portland Mayor’s Office will need a broad network of community partners outside the traditional downtown business channels to ensure a diversity of ideas make it to the table with real power to shape and deliver on strategic priorities. 

What would you do to streamline the city permitting process for media production projects? What other steps can Portland take to facilitate media productions? 

As a small business founder myself, I’m sympathetic to the challenges of navigating Portland’s numerous outdated byzantine commission form of government and clunky permitting processes. Portland should be attempting to minimize these transaction costs so that local film production can spend more resources on livable wages for their employees, not on endless paperwork. I’m certainly interested to hear more from OMPA members about which permits, regulations, processes, and bureaus present the most significant barriers and costs to production and willing to work with industry leaders to address them in a timely fashion.  

What steps would you take to attract more media production projects to Portland? 

The most important thing the Portland mayor can do in this realm is decide that attracting these types of projects to Portland is important and invest in it. Portland is not Los Angeles or Vancouver; as with wines, microbrews and other cultural and agricultural products our focus should be on quality and sustainability.  Toronto has made great gains in this front by approaching the industry both vertically and horizontally, and Portland’s existing tech and export sectors are an asset here even as we create pipelines of opportunity through investments in education, jobs training, and entrepreneurship. WE should continue to evaluate successes and limitations in the Innovation Quadrant model for areas such as Gateway Innovation district as a place-based means of expanding opportunity through this sector and to take our local capacity to the next level.  

I’ll conclude by pointing out that film and media professionals, like Portlanders across all industries, need substantial policy shifts to tackle the pernicious problem of Portland’s lack of affordable housing. Portland can only continue to attract and retain top creative talent if people can afford to live here. My 3800-word “Housing for All” plan provides a diagnosis of why we’re continuing to stagnate on providing enough housing, and includes specific language about how I’d govern to bolster tenant protections, provide more housing near transit, and support other initiatives to ensure ample workforce housing OMPA-affiliated businesses require to attract and retain talent. Please visit this plan online at https://sarah2020.com/housingforall.  

Are you currently using, or would you be willing to use, a local production company for your campaign’s advertisements and other video needs?  

By my unofficial account, my campaign has already paid at least four local artists and production companies in the course of this campaign. We’ve been deliberate about seeking out local talent for the production of our content, and intend to continue to do so until the conclusion of the election in November. We launched our campaign with a video made by a local videographer most well known for music videos, we commissioned an art poster from a local artist, our operations director comes from the entertainment industry, and we have bought local whenever possible not just for art but for all aspects of our campaign.  We have also regularly contracted with local ASL interpreters and accessibility consultants to ensure accessibility of everything we produce.  

Is there anything else you’d like to share with us that would be relevant to the members of our industry? 

As a former program administrator who brought international urban development experts to Portland, I’m acutely familiar with Portland’s brand in the global marketplace and the relative strengths and weaknesses of our approach. I am deeply aware that Portland’s Technology & Media cluster is one of the fastest growing in our economy, employing nearly 14,000 people in Multnomah County and that at present Prosper Portland is engaged in business assistance in this realm; however, we are falling short of our goals in terms of equitable access to programs and resources for BIPOC Portlanders via the Tech Pledge. I am committed to remediating this. It is unacceptable that after three years of investment we have a net LOSS of Black workers in the Tech Pledge companies.  

To remedy this, if elected, I will appoint a Director of Small Business & Entrepreneurship to be located in the Portland Mayor’s Office to evaluate Portland’s small business and entrepreneurship ecosystem, better align strategic partnerships and investments, and liaison between city hall and various business organizations and advocacy groups (across sectors) citywide to deliver a clear set of deliverables based in our equity goals. They will also lead on streamlining Small Business Administration support for small businesses as well as investments in data collection systems of underrepresented entrepreneurs and employers to scale up their share of the economy. The Technology and Media sector will be a critical partner in the work of creating low-carbon jobs of the future which present opportunities for greater shared prosperity for Portlanders.  

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Teressa Raiford

Please give an overview of your economic development plan. What part does media production play in Portland’s economy? 

Media production is an under-utilized asset in Portland’s economy. I feel like Portland residents need increased media awareness and production companies outside of the state should be encouraged to partner with local producers to take advantage of the many unique physical attributes of the Oregon landscape. That encouragement often takes the form of tax breaks, but we should begin raising more promotion and awareness as well. 

What is your general opinion of the Oregon Production investment Fund (OPIF) and the indigenous Oregon Production Investment Fund (iOPIF)? How would you direct city resources to support these programs? 

The OPIF should be expanded and the $1 million limit should be lowered. The point of increasing production is to increase employment. Lowering the $1 million limit would encourage smaller productions and short term productions like episodic television to consider working in the state, employing people on a freelance basis.  

What would you do to streamline the city permitting process for media production projects? What other steps can Portland take to facilitate media productions? 

My knowledge on the permitting process is limited but I would love to collaborate with media production companies in Portland to create more innovative ways for the city to be a partner in developing opportunities. 

What steps would you take to attract more media production projects to Portland?

Implementing tax breaks and highlighting the talent that lives here would be a great start. There are a lot of graphic designers, animators and studios that deserve more opportunities. As I said above, I’d love to collaborate more within the media industry to see how the city could better understand and serve these needs. 

Are you currently using, or would you be willing to use, a local production company for your campaign’s advertisements and other video needs?  

I have used a local production team here in Portland by the name of Fifth Column Films for years as well as others for documenting my nonprofits’ educational programming and protests. Some of this footage has been used in documentaries and has been re-circulated through literature; a majority of our content has been stored in our local archives. We have created a platform for this industry through our outreach. 

Is there anything else you’d like to share with us that would be relevant to the members of our industry? 

The fact that there isn’t a large industry presence here is an opportunity to imagine and build a community that reflects the values we hold dear. The reason grunge came out of Seattle is because nobody was looking for new music in Seattle, so they had time and space to imagine something new. As the old-boy Hollywood network system eats itself, there is an opportunity to imagine not just new artistic creations, but a new production model that is sustainable, equitable, and transparent. City government can start with leading by example.

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PORTLAND CITY COUNCIL

Mingus Mapps

Please give an overview of your economic development plan. What part does media production play in Portland’s economy?

My Vision for Economy:

My economic development plans focus on helping Portlanders survive and eventually recover from the economic crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.  My first priority is to provide for the basic human needs of Portlanders.  I am particularly concerned about housing security.   That is why until this crisis has passed,  I will fight to halt all residential evictions and home foreclosures.  

In addition to providing for the basic needs of all Portlanders, I will also fight for economic recovery.  Because this crisis is so deep, and our resources are few, preparing for recovery will require us to reimagine and repurpose government.  That is why I want to expand the mission of Prosper Portland to include economic recovery.  Let’s task Travel Portland with aiding the tourism industry.  And I will ask RACC and the Portland Film Office to take the lead in distributing technical and financial support to our arts community.  

Supporting media production is also one of our strategies for promoting economic recovery.  In the pre-COVID-19 days, the film industry provided thousands of Oregonians with family wage jobs and generated tens of millions of dollars in economic activity.  The film industry can also play an important role in Portland’s post-COVID-19 economy.  The economic activity generated by film productions can help jump start Portland’s economy.   


RELATED CONTENT
Hear more from Sarah Iannarone and Mingus Mapps, plus current Portland Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, in our Fall Candidate Forum (recording). The forum was hosted in partnership with MusicPortland, RACC, and Design Week Portland.
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What is your general opinion of the Oregon Production investment Fund (OPIF)? Would you direct city resources, such as the work of the City’s lobbyist,  to support these programs? 

I support the Oregon Producing Investment Fund and would support expanding it.  However,  before I lobby for expansion, I would like a briefing on an element of this program–the “state tax credit auction.”  The state tax credit is an unusual and innovative strategy for funding programs.  I can only find three programs in the United States, which use state tax credit auctions.  I have found very little research on how the auctions are working out in the real world.   And the bidding history for Oregon tax credits is odd.  For example, it seems fairly common for people to bid more than $500 for a $500 tax credit.  If that is true, why place any cap on the amount of Oregon tax credits auctioned?  The state tax credit auction is clearly a really interesting policy space.  I look forward to learning more about this innovative tool.

This year the Portland Film Office was nearly cut out of the City’s budget yet that office is critical to attracting film, television and commercial production and its spending to the city. Would you support the City finding a way to pay for the Portland Film Office considering its economic and tourism impact?

When I am in City Hall, I will work to provide the Portland Film Office with stable, sustainable funding.   And I will ask the Mayor to appoint me to be the liaison to the PFO. 

It is imperative that we support a diverse talent pipeline in this industry. One program we have in place is Oregon Media Pathways that places traditionally underrepresented candidates into paid positions on productions.  How could you see the City supporting this or related equity focused programming?

One of the ways we can diversify Portland’s film industry is to make sure that every kid in Portland has access to a high quality arts education.  That is why I support the arts tax and want to make it even better. In its current form, the Arts Tax costs too much to administer and generates less revenue than promised. Part of the problem here is the clunky way the tax is administered. Let’s fix that.  One possibility is working with the State of Oregon to collect this fee through the state’s income tax form.  I also support making the Arts Tax more progressive. The City should both exempt more low income Portlanders from the tax and link the tax rate to earnings. 

After providing every kid in Portland in the arts, we need to make sure that professional artists can afford to live and work in Portland.  That is why, when I am on City Council, I will be a champion for implementing the City’s “Plan for Preserving and Expanding Affordable Arts Space in Portland.” That plan contains 24 promising ideas to bring more affordable arts spaces to Portland.  The problem is too few of those ideas have actually been implemented.  I will change that.  

Finally, I want to explore ways the Prosper Portland, labor unions, and the film community can partner to fund apprenticeships programs in media production.

What steps would you take to attract more media production projects to Portland?

Here are some of the steps I will take to attract more media production projects to Portland.

  • Provide tax incentives for media projects. 
  • Expand the Oregon Production investment Fund 
  • Provide the Portland Film Office with stable funding 
  • Develop local filming ordinances that are consistent, clear and flexible.
  • Simplify the City’s permit process
  • Implement a program that makes city property available to film-makers at a low cost.
  • Respond quickly and comprehensively to film industry requests
  • Implement a cost-recovery mechanism that charges film-makers a fair and reasonable amount to cover any of the city’s resources used to accommodate filming.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with us that would be relevant to the members of our industry?

I want you to know that I think the arts and culture play an indispensable role in the cultural and economic life of our city.  The arts are one of the ways we express, celebrate and explore our civic identity. Art can challenge us to do better on issues ranging from climate change to racism.  And the murals at the Hollywood Transit Center remind us that arts can help a city heal.  Of course, the arts play an important role in Portland’s economy.   Thousands of Portlanders work in the arts industry.   Each year, the arts generate hundreds of millions of dollars of economic activity in Oregon and nearly $30 million in state and local taxes.

When I am on City Council, my priorities for the arts will include: 

  • Empower and fund RACC to help local artists and arts organizations cope with the COVID-19 crisis.
  • Develop City policies that help artists and arts organizations accommodate social distancing.
  • Support policies that make it more affordable to make art in Portland. 
  • Make equity a priority n arts funding and programming 
  • Improve the administration of the Arts Tax

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STATE REPRESENTATIVES

Dr. Lisa Reynolds

Please give an overview of your economic development plan. What part does media production play in Oregon’s economy? 

We are in an economic downturn due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Many of the jobs we’ve lost and are continuing to lose in the pandemic are not coming back. We need to craft jobs programs in all sectors, especially those that contribute to combating and reversing climate change. I would like to see jobs programs prioritize communities that have been left behind, especially Oregonians who are Black, Indigenous and People of Color. In terms of media production, I would like to see that sector grow. 

Oregon has over time built a reputation for being welcoming to film, television and commercial production friendly. This is due to quality professionals, incredible locations as well as the bundle of incentives that our state offers. What is your general opinion of the Oregon Production Investment Fund (OPIF) and its related Regional aspect (rOPIF)? Would you support these programs? 

I support these programs – for the novel way the fund is raised as well as for the emphasis on spreading investments beyond the Metro area. 

It is imperative that we support a diverse talent pipeline in this industry. One program we have in place is Oregon Media Pathways that places traditionally underrepresented candidates into paid positions on productions. How could you see the state supporting this or related equity focused programming? 

Every program in Oregon needs to recast itself with an eye on equity, to rebalance the years of leaving underrepresented talent behind. This needs to be a baked-in requirement for projects. I have been moved by what Oregon Shakespeare Festival has been doing for years – casting people of color, people who are gender non-conforming, and differently abled actors in their productions. 

What steps would you take to attract more media production projects to Oregon? 

We need to incentivize projects to the degree that we receive an economic benefit from staging that project in Oregon. And, to be clear, benefits may extend beyond the dollars and cents spent in the production. 

Is there anything else you’d like to share with us that would be relevant to the members of our industry? 

My son was an extra in a locally produced tv show (“Everything Sucks”) and it was a very valuable experience. I hope work on art can proceed safely in COVID.

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Jason Kropf

Please give an overview of your economic development plan. What part does media production play in Oregon’s economy? 

My economic development plan starts with investing in Oregonians and in growing our own talent. As a Deputy District Attorney, much of my work has involved children in foster care and juveniles in our justice system. I would much rather invest in education and social safety net programs on the front end that help create stability and economic opportunities for Oregonians. For me, these economic opportunities will always start with fully funded public schools and strong career and technical training programs that provide young people with multiple pathways to success. Media production plays a large role in this – I’d like to make sure that young people have access to these good paying jobs and strong training programs that set Oregonians on a pathway to economic stability and success. Media production is an avenue for economic growth in Oregon and a field in which we can encourage and support more jobs. 

Oregon has over time built a reputation for being welcoming to film, television and commercial production friendly. This is due to quality professionals, incredible locations as well as the bundle of incentives that our state offers. What is your general opinion of the Oregon Production Investment Fund (OPIF) and its related Regional aspect (rOPIF)? Would you support these programs?

The Oregon Production Investment Fund and its related regional aspect make sense to me – our state’s tax dollars should stay in Oregon and go towards supporting more local jobs in the media and production industry. This helps attract talent to our state, retain existing in-state talent, and creates economic growth in towns and cities in Oregon where production takes place. 

It is imperative that we support a diverse talent pipeline in this industry. One program we have in place is Oregon Media Pathways that places traditionally underrepresented candidates into paid positions on productions. How could you see the state supporting this or related equity focused programming? 

We all have a responsibility to dismantle racism in our policies, programs, and state budgets. As a legislator, I will reach out to impacted communities and evaluate every piece of legislation through a lens of racial equity. I would love to learn more about the Oregon Media Pathways program and I believe the state should invest in programs like it that train people for these positions. Part of this means ensuring that these jobs and training opportunities pay fairly and have good benefits, including health insurance. People should be paid fairly for their labor to ensure that pay or lack thereof isn’t a barrier to entering the workforce. We know that some industries have typically relied on unpaid internships to develop talent, and this is not conducive to creating a diverse workforce that reflects our communities. 

What steps would you take to attract more media production projects to Oregon? 

I believe we should retain the Oregon Production Investment Fund. I also think part of what makes Oregon an attractive place for media productions is our unparalleled landscape. I’ll take action to combat climate change so that we protect Oregon’s wilderness and mitigate the effects of wildfires and drought. Climate change not only endangers the lives of Oregonians, but from a practical standpoint, it also disrupts our economy. 

Are you currently using, or would you be willing to use, a local production company for your campaign’s advertisements and other video needs? 

Yes, I had a film and video shoot for my campaign back in August in which we used a talented local union crew. 

Is there anything else you’d like to share with us that would be relevant to the members of our industry?

I’m proud to have the support of workers and unions across the state. I’ll fight for fair wages, benefits, and safe working conditions for Oregonians.

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STATE SENATOR

Deb Patterson

Please give an overview of your economic development plan. What part does media production play in Oregon’s economy?  

While Oregon’s economy historically has been based on the extraction industries (timber, fishing, other natural resources), it has clearly moved to a more diversified economy, including agriculture, tourism, biomedical advances, technology, and niche manufacturing, among other industries.  Media production of course should play a key role in Oregon’s economic development plan.  

We have amazing opportunities for the film industry here in our state, given our vast and diverse unique landscapes and communities, and given the expertise among those who already live here and the exploding interest in film studies and production among students.  This industry can boost other industries, as well, including the other arts (musicians, for example), as well as tourism and general economic development.  

Oregon has over time built a reputation for being welcoming to film, television and commercial production friendly. This is due to quality professionals, incredible locations as well as the bundle of incentives that our state offers. What is your general opinion of the Oregon Production Investment Fund (OPIF) and its related Regional aspect (rOPIF)? Would you support these programs? 

The Oregon Production Investment Fund and its regional funds are dollars well spent to attract production teams in film, TV, and marketing, bringing dollars to a wide range of locations and communities throughout our state.  These dollars help to market Oregon, its people, places, and products, and help to undergird the economies where production takes place – through support of smaller businesses, such as media companies, equipment rental, catering, hotel and room rentals, and other ancillary supports.  The more we can strengthen and diversify Oregon’s economy, the better.  

It is imperative that we support a diverse talent pipeline in this industry. One program we have in place is Oregon Media Pathways that places traditionally underrepresented candidates into paid positions on productions.  How could you see the state supporting this or related equity focused programming?  

I would support expanding the Oregon Media Pathways work through every high school and college in the state, and would encourage any public dollars spent on media to use an equity lens in all aspects of productions.   

What steps would you take to attract more media production projects to Oregon?

Well, I certainly would defer to your expertise here, but I appreciate the model of the National Film Board of Canada which supports all kinds of innovation in filmmaking, helps to support the study of film at universities, and supports the production of films across the country.  Film festivals are a great way to build a wider audience, but with COVID-19-19, there will need to be new ways to host these – in parks? In people’s backyards?  The good news with COVID-19 is that everyone is watching a lot more movies (as well as TV) – but mostly from home.   Obviously, there needs to be incentives built in to support media production projects coming to Oregon and there will be significant revenue shortfalls, but the arts are always essential, and we will need to work together to support media production, as well.  It’s a win-win endeavor for the economy, and I’m guessing you have some good data around ROI.   

Is there anything else you’d like to share with us that would be relevant to the members of our industry? 

Thank you for what you do.  You give us hope, and keep us going! 

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